Pesticide Division Overview 

Overview | Hot Topics

About The Division

Before a pesticide can be sold in Arkansas, it must first be registered with the Plant Board in accordance with the Arkansas Pesticide Control Act and Regulations.  This allows the Plant Board to confirm that the product meets all State and Federal requirements to provide for both human and environmental protection.  Each year the Pesticide Division registers approximately 11,000  pesticides for use in the State.

Dealers that wish to sell or distribute those pesticides designated by the Environmental Protection Agency as "Restricted Use Products" must first obtain a license from the Plant Board to do so in accordance with the Arkansas Pesticide Use And Application Act and Regulations.  The Pesticide Division processes more than 400 dealer applications annually.

Both "users" and "applicators" of restricted use pesticides must be trained in the proper handling of such pesticides and then licensed by the Plant Board in accordance with the Arkansas Pesticide Use And Application Act and Regulations.  Those applicators that will apply pesticides commercially must also be tested before a license can be issued.  Each year the Pesticide Division issues approximately 6,000 Private Applicator Licenses, 1000 Commercial Applicator Licenses, 600 Non-Commercial Applicator Licenses, 400 Commercial Firm Licenses (ground and air), and 200 Custom Applicator Licenses and maintains approximately 19,400 active Private Applicator Licenses.

The division also takes its responsibility for taking enforcement action against those persons who fail to comply with the laws and regulations very seriously.  Enforcement actions are taken in a fair and equitable fashion as outlined by the Division's Enforcement Response Regulations.  Penalties can range from a warning letter to a monetary assessment of up to $1000 and license revocation.

The Pesticide Division is also responsible for enforcement of the Worker Protection Standard in Arkansas as it applies to the use of pesticides.  The Division is also involved in monitoring ground water for contamination by pesticides and the impact of pesticides on endangered species in the State.

The Pesticide Division is also responsible for implementation of the Arkansas Abandoned Agricultural Pesticide Program.  This program holds approximately 10 county wide collection events per year to remove old agricultural pesticides from the environment.

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National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. 
Beginning April 9, 2011 many agricultural pesticide applications will require an NPDES permit from the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.  To ensure compliance with this new federal requirement, a review of the information at www.epa.gov/npdes/pesticides is important.